Treatment of Category Generation and Retrieval in Aphasia: Effect of Typicality of Category Items PurposeKiran and colleagues (Kiran, 2007, 2008; Kiran & Johnson, 2008; Kiran & Thompson, 2003) previously suggested that training atypical examples within a semantic category is a more efficient treatment approach to facilitating generalization within the category than training typical examples. In the present study, the authors extended previous work examining ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2011
Treatment of Category Generation and Retrieval in Aphasia: Effect of Typicality of Category Items
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Swathi Kiran
    Boston University, Boston, MA
    Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Chaleece Sandberg
    Boston University, Boston, MA
    Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Rajani Sebastian
    University of Texas at Austin
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Correspondence to Swathi Kiran: kirans@bu.edu
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Lewis Shapiro
    Associate Editor: Lewis Shapiro×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   August 01, 2011
Treatment of Category Generation and Retrieval in Aphasia: Effect of Typicality of Category Items
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1101-1117. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0117)
History: Received May 3, 2010 , Revised October 7, 2010 , Accepted November 21, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1101-1117. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0117)
History: Received May 3, 2010; Revised October 7, 2010; Accepted November 21, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

PurposeKiran and colleagues (Kiran, 2007, 2008; Kiran & Johnson, 2008; Kiran & Thompson, 2003) previously suggested that training atypical examples within a semantic category is a more efficient treatment approach to facilitating generalization within the category than training typical examples. In the present study, the authors extended previous work examining the notion of semantic complexity within goal-derived (ad hoc) categories in individuals with aphasia.

MethodsSix individuals with fluent aphasia (age range = 39–84 years) and varying degrees of naming deficits and semantic impairments were involved. Thirty typical and atypical items, each from 2 categories, were selected after an extensive stimulus norming task. Generative naming for the 2 categories was tested during baseline and treatment.

ResultsAs predicted, training atypical examples in the category resulted in generalization to untrained typical examples in 5 of 5 patient–treatment conditions. In contrast, training typical examples (which was examined in 3 conditions) produced mixed results. One patient showed generalization to untrained atypical examples, whereas 2 patients did not show generalization to untrained atypical examples.

ConclusionResults of the present study supplement existing data on the effect of a semantically based treatment for lexical retrieval by manipulating the typicality of category examples.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC006359-03 and a New Century Research Scholars Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation to the first author. We thank Lisa Edmonds and Shilpa Shamapant for their assistance during various stages of the project and Crystal Cavin and Jessica Guzman for their role in analyzing the naming errors. Finally, we thank the participants in the experiment for their patience and cooperation.
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