Development of a Short Form of the Boston Naming Test for Individuals With Aphasia PurposeThe purpose of this study was to develop a short form of the Boston Naming Test (BNT; Kaplan, Goodglass, & Weintraub, 2001) for individuals with aphasia and compare it with 2 existing short forms originally analyzed with responses from people with dementia and neurologically healthy adults.MethodDevelopment of the new BNT–Aphasia ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2011
Development of a Short Form of the Boston Naming Test for Individuals With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christina M. del Toro
    University of Florida, Gainesville
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Lauren P. Bislick
    University of Washington, Seattle
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Matthew Comer
    University of Florida, Gainesville
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Craig Velozo
    University of Florida, Gainesville
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Sergio Romero
    University of Florida, Gainesville
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi
    University of Florida, Gainesville
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Diane L. Kendall
    University of Washington, Seattle
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Correspondence to Christina M. del Toro: cdeltoro@uw.edu
  • Christina M. del Toro is now with the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington.
    Christina M. del Toro is now with the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington.×
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Mary Kennedy
    Associate Editor: Mary Kennedy×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   August 01, 2011
Development of a Short Form of the Boston Naming Test for Individuals With Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1089-1100. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0119)
History: Received June 11, 2009 , Revised September 23, 2009 , Accepted November 18, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1089-1100. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0119)
History: Received June 11, 2009; Revised September 23, 2009; Accepted November 18, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to develop a short form of the Boston Naming Test (BNT; Kaplan, Goodglass, & Weintraub, 2001) for individuals with aphasia and compare it with 2 existing short forms originally analyzed with responses from people with dementia and neurologically healthy adults.

MethodDevelopment of the new BNT–Aphasia Short Form and analysis of the other 2 forms were completed with archival data from 100 individuals with aphasia. The authors developed the BNT–Aphasia Short Form using items from the original 60-item instrument based on item response theory. Rasch analysis was computed on the short forms developed by Graves, Bezeau, Fogarty, and Blair (2004)  and by Mack, Freed, Williams, and Henderson (1992) .

ResultsAnalysis of the Graves et al. (2004)  short form resulted in the smallest range of item difficulty and the largest floor effect compared with the Mack et al. (1992)  short form and the BNT–Aphasia short form. The BNT–Aphasia Short Form showed an increase in information in the middle of the scale relative to both the Graves et al. and the Mack et al. forms.

ConclusionsThe new short form demonstrates good psychometric properties when used with individuals with aphasia. However, the Mack et al. form proved to be as psychometrically sound as the BNT–Aphasia Short Form and is also appropriate for individuals with aphasia.

Acknowledgments
This material is based on work supported, in part, by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service.
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