A Critical Evaluation of Gestural Stiffness Estimations in Speech Production Based on a Linear Second-Order Model PurposeLinear second-order models have often been used to investigate properties of speech production. However, these models are inaccurate approximations of the speech apparatus. This study aims at assessing how reliably stiffness can be estimated from kinematics with these models.MethodArticulatory movements were collected for 9 speakers of German during the production ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2011
A Critical Evaluation of Gestural Stiffness Estimations in Speech Production Based on a Linear Second-Order Model
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susanne Fuchs
    Center for General Linguistics (Zentrum für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft [ZAS]/Phonetik), Berlin, Germany
    Center for General Linguistics (Zentrum für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft [ZAS]/Phonetik), Berlin, Germany
  • Pascal Perrier
    Département Parole et Cognition (DPC)/Gipsa-lab, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Grenoble INP, Grenoble, France
    Département Parole et Cognition (DPC)/Gipsa-lab, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Grenoble INP, Grenoble, France
  • Mariam Hartinger
    Center for General Linguistics (Zentrum für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft [ZAS]/Phonetik), Berlin, Germany
    Center for General Linguistics (Zentrum für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft [ZAS]/Phonetik), Berlin, Germany
  • Dedication: This work is dedicated to Dieter Fuchs.
    Dedication: This work is dedicated to Dieter Fuchs.×
  • Correspondence to Pascal Perrier: Pascal.Perrier@gipsa-lab.grenoble-inp.fr
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Research Note   |   August 01, 2011
A Critical Evaluation of Gestural Stiffness Estimations in Speech Production Based on a Linear Second-Order Model
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1067-1076. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0131)
History: Received May 15, 2010 , Revised October 27, 2010 , Accepted December 22, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1067-1076. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0131)
History: Received May 15, 2010; Revised October 27, 2010; Accepted December 22, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeLinear second-order models have often been used to investigate properties of speech production. However, these models are inaccurate approximations of the speech apparatus. This study aims at assessing how reliably stiffness can be estimated from kinematics with these models.

MethodArticulatory movements were collected for 9 speakers of German during the production of reiterant CVCV words at varying speech rates. Velocity peaks, movement amplitudes, and gesture durations were measured. In the context of an undamped model, 2 stiffness estimations were compared that should theoretically yield the same result. In the context of a damped model, gestural stiffness and damping were calculated for each gesture.

ResultsNumerous cases were found in which stiffness estimations based on the undamped model contradicted each other. Less than 80% of the data were found to be compatible with the properties of the damped model. Stiffness tends to decrease with gestural duration. However, it is associated with a large, unrealistic damping dispersion, making stiffness estimations from kinematic data to a large extent unreliable.

ConclusionAny conclusions about speech control based on stiffness estimations using linear second-order models should therefore be considered with caution.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by a grant from the Bundes Ministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) and the French-German University to the project PILIOS carried out jointly at Gipsa-lab in Grenoble and ZAS in Berlin.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access