Prosodic Adaptations to Pitch Perturbation in Running Speech PurposeA feedback perturbation paradigm was used to investigate whether prosodic cues are controlled independently or in an integrated fashion during sentence production.MethodTwenty-one healthy speakers of American English were asked to produce sentences with emphatic stress while receiving real-time auditory feedback of their productions. The fundamental frequency (F0) of the stressed ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2011
Prosodic Adaptations to Pitch Perturbation in Running Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rupal Patel
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
  • Caroline Niziolek
    Harvard–MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA
    Harvard–MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Kevin Reilly
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
  • Frank H. Guenther
    Harvard–MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA
    Harvard–MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Correspondence to Rupal Patel: r.patel@neu.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer
    Associate Editor: Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   August 01, 2011
Prosodic Adaptations to Pitch Perturbation in Running Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1051-1059. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0162)
History: Received June 11, 2010 , Accepted December 5, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1051-1059. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0162)
History: Received June 11, 2010; Accepted December 5, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

PurposeA feedback perturbation paradigm was used to investigate whether prosodic cues are controlled independently or in an integrated fashion during sentence production.

MethodTwenty-one healthy speakers of American English were asked to produce sentences with emphatic stress while receiving real-time auditory feedback of their productions. The fundamental frequency (F0) of the stressed word in each 4-word sentence was selectively shifted in a sensorimotor adaptation protocol. Speakers experienced either an upward or a downward shift of the stressed word, which gradually altered the perceived stress of the sentence.

ResultsParticipants in the Up and Down groups adapted to F0 shifts by altering the contrast between stressed and unstressed words differentially, such that the two groups deviated from each other in the perturbation phase. Furthermore, selective F0 perturbation in sentences with emphatic stress resulted in compensatory changes in both F0 and intensity.

ConclusionsPresent findings suggest that F0 and intensity are controlled in an integrated fashion to maintain the contrast between stressed and unstressed words. When a cue is impaired through perturbation, speakers not only oppose the perturbation but enhance other prosodic cues to achieve emphatic stress.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC02852. We thank Katherine Alexander, Pamela Campellone, and Demetris Roumis for their time and dedication to data collection and annotation as well as Jonathan Brumberg, Matthew Fortier, and Mark Tiede for their efforts in implementing the customized acoustic and statistical analysis tools.
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