Investigating Speech Perception in Children With Dyslexia: Is There Evidence of a Consistent Deficit in Individuals? PurposeThe claim that speech perception abilities are impaired in dyslexia was investigated in a group of 62 children with dyslexia and 51 average readers matched in age.MethodTo test whether there was robust evidence of speech perception deficits in children with dyslexia, speech perception in noise and quiet was measured using ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
Investigating Speech Perception in Children With Dyslexia: Is There Evidence of a Consistent Deficit in Individuals?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Souhila Messaoud-Galusi
    University College London, United Kingdom
  • Valerie Hazan
    University College London, United Kingdom
  • Stuart Rosen
    University College London, United Kingdom
  • Correspondence to Valerie Hazan: v.hazan@ucl.ac.uk
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Beverly Wright
    Associate Editor: Beverly Wright×
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   December 01, 2011
Investigating Speech Perception in Children With Dyslexia: Is There Evidence of a Consistent Deficit in Individuals?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1682-1701. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/09-0261)
History: Received December 7, 2009 , Revised July 16, 2010 , Accepted April 8, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1682-1701. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/09-0261)
History: Received December 7, 2009; Revised July 16, 2010; Accepted April 8, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 23

PurposeThe claim that speech perception abilities are impaired in dyslexia was investigated in a group of 62 children with dyslexia and 51 average readers matched in age.

MethodTo test whether there was robust evidence of speech perception deficits in children with dyslexia, speech perception in noise and quiet was measured using 8 different tasks involving the identification and discrimination of a complex and highly natural synthetic “bee”–“pea” contrast (copy synthesized from natural models) and the perception of naturally produced words.

ResultsChildren with dyslexia, on average, performed more poorly than did average readers in the synthetic syllables identification task in quiet and in across-category discrimination (but not when tested using an adaptive procedure). They did not differ from average readers on 2 tasks of word recognition in noise or identification of synthetic syllables in noise. For all tasks, a majority of individual children with dyslexia performed within norms. Finally, speech perception generally did not correlate with pseudoword reading or phonological processing—the core skills related to dyslexia.

ConclusionsOn the tasks and speech stimuli that the authors used, most children with dyslexia did not appear to show a consistent deficit in speech perception.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Wellcome Trust Grant 076499/Z/05/Z. We thank Mike Coleman, who designed the testing software used in this study, and Steve Nevard, who provided technical support. Many thanks are also due to Christian Ritz for his generous assistance in providing advice concerning the use of his statistical package “drc.” Finally, we would like to thank the participants and their family members for their help, as well as the following schools and their staff: Ellesmere College, Northease Manor School, Abingdon House School, Hazlegrove Preparatory School, Hurst Lodge, Mayville High School, Prior Park College, Trinity School, Sidcot School, Appleford School, Knowl Hill School, Calder House School, Edington & Shapwick School, Thomas' Battersea, St Christopher’s School, and Riddlesworth Hall School.
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