Concurrent and Construct Validity of Oral Language Measures With School-Age Children With Specific Language Impairment PurposeThis study investigated the psychometric properties of 2 oral language measures that are commonly used for diagnostic purposes with school-age children who have language impairments.MethodTwo hundred sixteen children with specific language impairment were assessed with the Test of Language Development—Primary, Third Edition (TOLD–P:3; Newcomer & Hammill, 1997) and the Comprehensive ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
Concurrent and Construct Validity of Oral Language Measures With School-Age Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • LaVae M. Hoffman
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Diane Frome Loeb
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Jayne Brandel
    Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Correspondence to LaVae M. Hoffman: lmh3f@virginia.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Sean Redmond
    Associate Editor: Sean Redmond×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   December 01, 2011
Concurrent and Construct Validity of Oral Language Measures With School-Age Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1597-1608. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0213)
History: Received August 2, 2010 , Revised December 9, 2010 , Accepted April 5, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1597-1608. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0213)
History: Received August 2, 2010; Revised December 9, 2010; Accepted April 5, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeThis study investigated the psychometric properties of 2 oral language measures that are commonly used for diagnostic purposes with school-age children who have language impairments.

MethodTwo hundred sixteen children with specific language impairment were assessed with the Test of Language Development—Primary, Third Edition (TOLD–P:3; Newcomer & Hammill, 1997) and the Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL; Carrow-Woolfolk, 1999) within a 3-month period. The concurrent and construct validities of these 2 published tests were explored through correlation analysis and principle-component factor analysis.

ResultsThe TOLD–P:3 Spoken Language Quotient and CASL Core Composite scores were found to have an intertest correlation value of r = .596 within this sample, and a paired samples t test revealed a statistically significant difference between these scores. Principle-component factor analyses revealed a 2-factor structure solution for the TOLD–P:3, whereas data from the CASL supported a single-factor model.

ConclusionsAnalyses of assessment measure performance data from a sample of school-age children with specific language impairment revealed concurrent validity values and construct validity patterns that differed from those found in the norming samples as cited in examiner manuals. Implications for practice patterns and future research are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this article was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant NIH 1-RO1-DC04560. We extend our appreciation to Randall R. Robey at the University of Virginia for his support and encouragement during the final manuscript preparation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access