A MEG Investigation of Single-Word Auditory Comprehension in Aphasia PurposeTo explore whether individuals with aphasia exhibit differences in the M350, an electrophysiological marker of lexical activation, compared with healthy controls.MethodSeven people with aphasia, 9 age-matched controls, and 10 younger controls completed an auditory lexical decision task while cortical activity was recorded with magnetoencephalography. There were 2 stimulus conditions of ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
A MEG Investigation of Single-Word Auditory Comprehension in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauryn Zipse
    Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Boston
  • Kevin Kearns
    State University of New York at Fredonia
  • Marjorie Nicholas
    Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Boston
  • Alec Marantz
    New York University, New York, NY
  • Correspondence to Lauryn Zipse: lzipse@mghihp.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Associate Editor: Swathi Kiran×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   December 01, 2011
A MEG Investigation of Single-Word Auditory Comprehension in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1577-1596. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0067)
History: Received March 8, 2010 , Revised August 11, 2010 , Accepted March 24, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1577-1596. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0067)
History: Received March 8, 2010; Revised August 11, 2010; Accepted March 24, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

PurposeTo explore whether individuals with aphasia exhibit differences in the M350, an electrophysiological marker of lexical activation, compared with healthy controls.

MethodSeven people with aphasia, 9 age-matched controls, and 10 younger controls completed an auditory lexical decision task while cortical activity was recorded with magnetoencephalography. There were 2 stimulus conditions of interest: identity primed (i.e., a word preceded by itself) and semantic primed (i.e., a word preceded by a semantically related word). Latency and amplitude of the M350 response as well as reaction time were measured.

ResultsConsistent with the age-matched control group, the group with aphasia showed both identity and semantic priming behaviorally. In contrast to the control groups, the group with aphasia did not show either semantic or identity priming of the M350 response. This group also demonstrated longer M350 latencies than either control group. Furthermore, within this group, M350 latency was positively correlated with a measure of semantic impairment.

ConclusionsThese findings highlight the usefulness of temporally sensitive measures when studying aphasia and demonstrate that the latency of electrophysiological markers is of interest in this population. In particular, increased M350 latency appears to be indicative of a semantic processing impairment.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes of Health Training Grant 5T32DC000038-20, awarded to the Harvard–MIT Speech and Hearing Biosciences and Technology Program, in which the first author was a graduate student. We would like to thank our research participants for making this study possible.
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