The Effects of Race and Maternal Education Level on Children’s Retells of the Renfrew Bus Story—North American Edition PurposeThe Renfrew Bus Story—North American Edition (RBS–NA; C. Glasgow & J. Cowley, 1994) is widely used in clinical and research settings to determine children’s language abilities, although possible influences of race and maternal education on RBS–NA performance are unknown. The current study compared RBS–NA retells of 4 groups of children: ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2011
The Effects of Race and Maternal Education Level on Children’s Retells of the Renfrew Bus Story—North American Edition
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne van Kleeck
    University of Texas at Dallas
  • Alissa Lange
    University at Buffalo, State University of New York
  • Amy Louise Schwarz
    University of Texas at Dallas
  • Correspondence to Anne van Kleeck: annevk@utdallas.edu
  • Alissa Lange is now with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ
    Alissa Lange is now with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ×
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais
    Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   December 01, 2011
The Effects of Race and Maternal Education Level on Children’s Retells of the Renfrew Bus Story—North American Edition
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1546-1561. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0079)
History: Received March 26, 2010 , Accepted January 10, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2011, Vol. 54, 1546-1561. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0079)
History: Received March 26, 2010; Accepted January 10, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeThe Renfrew Bus Story—North American Edition (RBS–NA; C. Glasgow & J. Cowley, 1994) is widely used in clinical and research settings to determine children’s language abilities, although possible influences of race and maternal education on RBS–NA performance are unknown. The current study compared RBS–NA retells of 4 groups of children: African American (AA) children and European American (EA) children whose mothers had an education level of high school or less (≤ HS) and those whose mothers had an education level higher than high school (> HS).

MethodStatistical tests were used to examine 172 kindergartners' story retells using raw scores for all 4 RBS–NA measures: (a) Information, (b) Sentence Length, (c) Complexity, and (d) Independence.

ResultsA 2 × 2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed main effects of maternal education and race for the Information score, with ≤ HS and AA children scoring lower. For measures not meeting ANOVA assumptions, 2 × 2 ANOVAs using ranked data indicated significant main effects of maternal education for Sentence Length, Complexity, and Independence measure, with ≤ HS children scoring lower within the AA group.

ConclusionThere are systematic effects of maternal education and race on children’s RBS–NA performance, which is important for both researchers and clinicians to take into account when using this instrument.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this article was supported by Grant R305K05157 from the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, awarded to the University at Buffalo, State University of New York (PIs: D. H. Clements and J. Sarama, “Scaling Up TRIAD: Teaching Early Mathematics for Understanding With Trajectories and Technologies”). The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views of the U.S. Department of Education.
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