Article  |   December 2011
Resilience and Stuttering: Factors That Protect People From the Adversity of Chronic Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ashley Craig
    Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Elaine Blumgart
    Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Yvonne Tran
    Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Correspondence to Ashley Craig: a.craig@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Anderson
    Associate Editor: Julie Anderson×
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech
Article   |   December 2011
Resilience and Stuttering: Factors That Protect People From the Adversity of Chronic Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research December 2011, Vol.54, 1485-1496. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0304)
History: Accepted 28 Mar 2011 , Received 01 Nov 2010 , Revised 31 Jan 2011
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research December 2011, Vol.54, 1485-1496. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0304)
History: Accepted 28 Mar 2011 , Received 01 Nov 2010 , Revised 31 Jan 2011

Purpose: Chronic disorder can impose a significant negative mental health burden. This research was conducted to explore factors that may protect people from the adversity of chronic stuttering.

Method: The study employed a population group cohort design. Participants included 200 adults who have stuttered since childhood, and the sample was divided into those who were classified as resilient and nonresilient on the basis of their global psychopathology scores. Protective factor differences between the 2 groups were determined using multivariate analysis of variance and unique contributors to psychopathology were isolated using multiple regression.

Results: Factors that significantly distinguished between groups included superior levels of health status, social support, vitality and social functioning, fewer physical limitations, and a greater sense of self-efficacy. Three unique contributors to adaptive outcomes were found: self-efficacy, social support, and healthy social functioning.

Conclusions: A number of factors were isolated that potentially protect individuals with chronic stuttering from developing psychopathology. The findings provide a better understanding of how people cope with a chronic fluency disorder.

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