P300 Event-Related Potentials in Stutterers and Nonstutterers This study investigated possible differences between adult stutterers and nonstutterers in the P300 event-related potential. Responses to tonal stimuli were recorded from electrodes placed over the left (C3) and right (C4) hemispheres. The two groups exhibited different patterns of interhemispheric activity. Although all 8 participants in the fluent group exhibited ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1997
P300 Event-Related Potentials in Stutterers and Nonstutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael D. Morgan
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences State University of New York at Plattsburg
  • Jerry L. Cranford, PhD
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858
  • Kenneth Burk
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences Wichita State University Wichita, KS
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1997
P300 Event-Related Potentials in Stutterers and Nonstutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1997, Vol. 40, 1334-1340. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4006.1334
History: Received September 12, 1996 , Accepted May 27, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1997, Vol. 40, 1334-1340. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4006.1334
History: Received September 12, 1996; Accepted May 27, 1997

This study investigated possible differences between adult stutterers and nonstutterers in the P300 event-related potential. Responses to tonal stimuli were recorded from electrodes placed over the left (C3) and right (C4) hemispheres. The two groups exhibited different patterns of interhemispheric activity. Although all 8 participants in the fluent group exhibited P300s that were higher in amplitude over the right hemisphere, 5 of the 8 disfluent participants had higher amplitude activity over the left hemisphere. These results provide evidence that stutterers and nonstutterers may exhibit differences between hemispheres in the processing of some types of nonlinguistic (tonal) stimuli.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to express their gratitude to Dr. James Gumnick and the staff of the Neurophysiology Department at St. Francis Regional Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas, for their generous support and assistance with this research. We also wish to thank Drs. Michael Rastatter and Joseph Kalinowski for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of the present article, and Dr. Donald Holbert for valuable assistance with the statistical analyses.
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