The Influence of Sentence Elicitation Variables on Children's Speech Production This study investigated the potential influence of adult-modeled sentences on the speech production of 15 children with speech delays of unknown origin. Two comparison tokens of target words containing sounds with inconsistently realized phonemes were sampled in picture descriptions elicited with and without adultmodeled descriptive sentences. Ten listeners made forced-choice ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
The Influence of Sentence Elicitation Variables on Children's Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Audrey D. Weston
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology-Boise Idaho State University Pocatello
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
The Influence of Sentence Elicitation Variables on Children's Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 975-989. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.975
History: Received November 27, 1995 , Accepted February 18, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 975-989. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.975
History: Received November 27, 1995; Accepted February 18, 1997

This study investigated the potential influence of adult-modeled sentences on the speech production of 15 children with speech delays of unknown origin. Two comparison tokens of target words containing sounds with inconsistently realized phonemes were sampled in picture descriptions elicited with and without adultmodeled descriptive sentences. Ten listeners made forced-choice paired-comparisons to identify the children's relatively more advanced word productions. From 205 total comparisons, listeners identified 130 word pairs that included one token more advanced than the other. Significantly more of the children's advanced word productions occurred in sentences elicited with an adult model sentence. Discussion considers theoretical and clinical perspectives of an assumption that variables facilitating children's language production may benefit speech production.

Acknowledgments
This research is based on a dissertation supported in part by the Public Health Service, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, “Studies in Developmental Phonological Disorders,” University of Wisconsin-Madison, Grant No. DC00496. I wish to extend special thanks to Lawrence D. Shriberg for his invaluable contributions as Dissertation Director. I also thank Doris Kistler for her statistical consultation and Carmen Rasmussen and Hye-Keung Seung for their help in data analysis. Finally, the comments, questions, and editorial suggestions received through the anonymous review process were particularly constructive, instructive, and insightful—a tremendous help in integrating the details of this study.
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