The Perception of Internal Circuit Noise in Hearing Aids by Listeners With Normal Hearing Internal circuit noise in hearing aids is distracting to a listener and, if loud enough, may interfere with intelligibility, either by direct masking of weak components of speech or through the generation of undesired intermodulation products, which can also act as a source of masking. The objective characteristics of noise ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
The Perception of Internal Circuit Noise in Hearing Aids by Listeners With Normal Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeremy Agnew
    Starkey Laboratories, Inc. Eden Prairie, MN
  • Michael Block
    Starkey Laboratories, Inc. Eden Prairie, MN
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
The Perception of Internal Circuit Noise in Hearing Aids by Listeners With Normal Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1177-1191. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1177
History: Received October 30, 1996 , Accepted April 10, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1177-1191. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1177
History: Received October 30, 1996; Accepted April 10, 1997

Internal circuit noise in hearing aids is distracting to a listener and, if loud enough, may interfere with intelligibility, either by direct masking of weak components of speech or through the generation of undesired intermodulation products, which can also act as a source of masking. The objective characteristics of noise may be measured; however, wearers of hearing aids often differ in their subjective reporting of the perceived characteristics of the internal noise. This study reports on the results for four listeners with normal hearing of matching pitch and amplitude to the internal noise generated within a series of hearing aids. Results of these experiments showed that the listeners (a) primarily matched the perceived pitch of the noise to the frequency of their most sensitive hearing, and (b) matched the perceived level of the noise approximately to the total SPL noise level.

Acknowledgment
Part of the data in this paper was presented as a poster at the Issues in Advanced Hearing Aid Research conference at Lake Arrowhead, CA, May 27-31, 1996.
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