Multisensory Speech Perception of Young Children With Profound Hearing Loss The contribution of a two-channel vibrotactile aid (Trill VTA 2/3, AVR Communications LTD) to the audiovisual perception of speech was evaluated in four young children with profound hearing loss using words and speech pattern contrasts. An intensive, hierarchical, and systematic training program was provided. The results show that the addition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
Multisensory Speech Perception of Young Children With Profound Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Liat Kishon-Rabin
    Department of Communication Disorders Sackler Faculty of Medicine Tel-Aviv University Israel
  • Nava Haras
    Department of Communication Disorders Sackler Faculty of Medicine Tel-Aviv University Israel
  • Moe Bergman
    Department of Communication Disorders Sackler Faculty of Medicine Tel-Aviv University Israel
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
Multisensory Speech Perception of Young Children With Profound Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1135-1150. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1135
History: Received April 26, 1996 , Accepted April 1, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1135-1150. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1135
History: Received April 26, 1996; Accepted April 1, 1997

The contribution of a two-channel vibrotactile aid (Trill VTA 2/3, AVR Communications LTD) to the audiovisual perception of speech was evaluated in four young children with profound hearing loss using words and speech pattern contrasts. An intensive, hierarchical, and systematic training program was provided. The results show that the addition of the tactile (T) modality to the auditory and visual (A+V) modalities enhanced speech perception performance significantly on all tests. Specifically, at the end of the training sessions, the tactile supplementation increased word recognition scores in a 44-word, closed-set task by 12 percentage points; detection of consonant in final position by 50 percentage points; detection of sibilant in final position by 30 percentage points; and detection of voicing in final position by 25 percentage points. Significant learning over time was evident for all test materials, in all modalities. As expected, fastest learning (i.e., smallest time constants) was found for the AVT condition. The results of this study provide further evidence that sensory information provided by the tactile modality can enhance speech perception in young children.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge Emma Sachratov for her technical support, Barak Dar and Ruth Sharon from AVR Communications LTD for the provision and maintenance of the tactile devices, Esther Shabtai for assisting in data analysis, and the teachers and children at the Tel-Aviv Micha Center for Hearing-Impaired Children for their time, patience, and cooperation. The authors also wish to thank Arthur Boothroyd, Sandra Gordon-Salant, Charissa Lansing, and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments in the review of the manuscript.
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