Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on People Who Stutter During Scripted Telephone Conversations The effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) conditions on stuttering during scripted telephone conversations was investigated. Nine adult participants made 15 scripted telephone calls to businesses in New York City. Alterations in the participants' auditory feedback signal were generated by a commercially available digital signal processor (Casa Futura Technologies Desktop ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 1997
Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on People Who Stutter During Scripted Telephone Conversations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephen Zimmerman
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Andrew Stuart
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Michael Rastatter
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Normal Language Processing / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 1997
Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on People Who Stutter During Scripted Telephone Conversations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1130-1134. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1130
History: Received January 22, 1997 , Accepted April 29, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1130-1134. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1130
History: Received January 22, 1997; Accepted April 29, 1997

The effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) conditions on stuttering during scripted telephone conversations was investigated. Nine adult participants made 15 scripted telephone calls to businesses in New York City. Alterations in the participants' auditory feedback signal were generated by a commercially available digital signal processor (Casa Futura Technologies Desktop Fluency System Model BTD-400) that shifted participants' speech one-half octave down in frequency, produced a 50-ms delay, or produced non-altered auditory feedback. The AAF effects produced by the digital signal processor were not perceived by the recipients of the telephone calls. The proportion of stuttering events per scripted telephone conversations were significantly reduced in the AAF conditions relative to the non-altered auditory feedback condition (p=.0004). Stuttering frequency was reduced by 55% and 60% for the FAF and DAF, respectively. These findings demonstrate the applicability of this technology to situations of daily living involving telephone use.

Acknowledgments
The assistance of Ms. Catherine S. Otto Montgomery in participant-recruitment is greatly appreciated.
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