On the Registration of Time and the Patterning of Speech Movements In order to study speech coordination we frequently average kinematic and other physiological signals. The averages are assumed to be more representative of the underlying patterns of production than individual records. In this note we outline different approaches to averaging and present a new nonlinear normalization technique that offers better ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
On the Registration of Time and the Patterning of Speech Movements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jorge C. Lucero
    Queen's University Kingston, Canada
  • Kevin G. Munhall
    Queen's University Kingston, Canada
  • Vincent L. Gracco
    Haskins Laboratories New Haven, CT
  • James O. Ramsay
    McGill University Montreal, Canada
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
On the Registration of Time and the Patterning of Speech Movements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1111-1117. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1111
History: Received January 22, 1997 , Accepted April 28, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1111-1117. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1111
History: Received January 22, 1997; Accepted April 28, 1997

In order to study speech coordination we frequently average kinematic and other physiological signals. The averages are assumed to be more representative of the underlying patterns of production than individual records. In this note we outline different approaches to averaging and present a new nonlinear normalization technique that offers better information than ensemble averaging, linear normalization, or feature alignment methods. We suggest that this technique provides a clear estimation of pattern shape while preserving information on the variation over time.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful to A. Smith and G. Ying for generously providing their time normalization software, and to L. Coady for her help in the collection of experimental data. This research was funded by NIH grant DC–00594 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and NSERC.
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