Development of a Two-Stage Procedure for the Automatic Recognition of Dysfluencies in the Speech of Children Who Stutter I. Psychometric Procedures Appropriate for Selection of Training Material for Lexical Dysfluency Classifiers Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
Development of a Two-Stage Procedure for the Automatic Recognition of Dysfluencies in the Speech of Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter Howell
    University College London England
  • Stevie Sackin
    University College London England
  • Kazan Glenn
    University College London England
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
Development of a Two-Stage Procedure for the Automatic Recognition of Dysfluencies in the Speech of Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1073-1084. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1073
History: Received August 8, 1996 , Accepted February 24, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1073-1084. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1073
History: Received August 8, 1996; Accepted February 24, 1997

This program of work is intended to develop automatic recognition procedures to locate and assess stuttered dysfluencies. This and the following article together, develop and test recognizers for repetitions and prolongations. The automatic recognizers classify the speech in two stages: In the first, the speech is segmented, and, in the second, the segments are categorized. The units that are segmented are words. Here assessments by human judges on the speech of 12 children who stutter are described using a corresponding procedure. The accuracy of word boundary placement across judges, categorization of the words as fluent, repetition or prolongation, and duration of the different fluency categories are reported. These measures allow reliable instances of repetitions and prolongations to be selected for training and assessing the recognizers in the subsequent paper.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Wellcome Trust. Grateful thanks to the children, their parents, and the staff of the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children (particularly Lena Rustin and Frances Cook). The comments of Drs. Au-Yeung, Curlee, Colcord, and Jennifer B. Watson are gratefully acknowledged.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access