Long-Term Phonatory Instability in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis This paper uses a new approach to describe and quantify the long-term phonatory instability of speakers with MS. Sustained vowel phonations of 20 individuals with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and 20 age- and gendermatched individuals with normal speech were recorded. The phonations were f0 and intensity analyzed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
Long-Term Phonatory Instability in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lena Hartelius
    Göteborg University Sweden
  • Eugene H. Buder
    The University of Memphis Tennessee
  • Edythe A. Strand
    University of Washington Seattle
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: ehbuder@cc.memphis.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
Long-Term Phonatory Instability in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1056-1072. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1056
History: Received March 12, 1996 , Accepted February 20, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1056-1072. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1056
History: Received March 12, 1996; Accepted February 20, 1997

This paper uses a new approach to describe and quantify the long-term phonatory instability of speakers with MS. Sustained vowel phonations of 20 individuals with a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and 20 age- and gendermatched individuals with normal speech were recorded. The phonations were f0 and intensity analyzed and subjected to spectral analysis using the Fast Fourier Transform. Three methods for analyzing the instabilities are presented, compared, and related to perceptual judgments: (a) coefficients of variation, (b) magnitudebased analysis of spectral energy, and (c) frequency-based analysis of spectral components. All measures reliably distinguished between individuals with MS and persons with normal speech. A single factor based on a linear discriminant analysis of the frequency-based measures was especially useful in distinguishing these groups. Critical frequency bands of instability, corresponding to wow (1–2 Hz), tremor (around 8 Hz), and flutter (17–18 Hz), distinguished the MS group from those of the control group.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Sweden-America Foundation and their support is hereby gratefully acknowledged. Support was also provided by grants 5-K08-DC0004305 and 1-T32-DC00033 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The authors wish to thank Fred Minifie, Kathy Yorkston, and Sean Iddings for their assistance with the research leading to this report, Lorraine Ramig, Julie Barkmeier, Michael Cannito, and two anonymous reviewers for their thoughtful comments, and deep appreciation is extended to the individuals and staff at the Multiple Sclerosis Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle.
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