Naming Difficulties in Language-Disabled Children Preliminary Findings With the Application of the Tip-of-the-Tongue Paradigm Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
Naming Difficulties in Language-Disabled Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Miriam Faust
    Bar-Ilan University Tel-Aviv University
  • Lilly Dimitrovsky
    Bar-Ilan University
  • Shira Davidi
    Tel-Aviv University
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
Naming Difficulties in Language-Disabled Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1026-1036. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1026
History: Received March 28, 1996 , Accepted March 23, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1026-1036. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1026
History: Received March 28, 1996; Accepted March 23, 1997

The "tip of the tongue" (TOT) paradigm in a picture-naming task was presented to 14 children with language disabilities (LD) and 14 children without language disabilities (ND). Although the two groups did not differ in the semantic information they had on words they could not fully retrieve, the LD children had less valid and more invalid phonological information. They also had fewer correct responses and spontaneous recalls, more "Don't Know"s (DK) and TOTs, and less accurate "feeling of knowing" (FOK) judgments. These results, demonstrating dissociation between the semantic and phonological levels of word representation, support a two-stage model of word retrieval. These findings are evidence in favor of a phonological treatment approach for naming problems in LD children.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the cooperation and helpful comments of Yora Weinstein of the Tel-Aviv Municipal Center for Speech and Hearing Services.
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