The Ability of Children With Specific Language Impairment to Access and Participate in an Ongoing Interaction This study investigated the ability of 6 children with specific language impairment (SLI), ages 8;10 to 12;5 (years; months), to enter and participate in an ongoing dyadic interaction. Performance was compared to that of 6 chronological agematched (CA) peers and 6 language-similar (LS) peers. All children in the LS and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
The Ability of Children With Specific Language Impairment to Access and Participate in an Ongoing Interaction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Julie Campbell Spencer
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Lee A. Robinson
    Jordan School District Sandy, UT
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
The Ability of Children With Specific Language Impairment to Access and Participate in an Ongoing Interaction
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1011-1025. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1011
History: Received November 6, 1995 , Accepted March 4, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1011-1025. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1011
History: Received November 6, 1995; Accepted March 4, 1997

This study investigated the ability of 6 children with specific language impairment (SLI), ages 8;10 to 12;5 (years; months), to enter and participate in an ongoing dyadic interaction. Performance was compared to that of 6 chronological agematched (CA) peers and 6 language-similar (LS) peers. All children in the LS and CA groups successfully accessed the interaction, and most did so quickly. Two children from the SLI group did not access, and the 4 remaining subjects required varying amounts of time to access. Following successful access, the triadic interactions of subjects were examined. The accessing children with SLI talked significantly less, were addressed significantly less, and collaborated less than either of the partners within their triads. Few significant differences were observed between LS or CA children and their partners.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the College of Education, Brigham Young University. We would like to thank Dr. Julie Washington and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments. We would also like to acknowledge and thank Lisa Higbee for assistance in data analysis. Finally, we would like to thank the administrators, speech-language pathologists, teachers, parents, and students of Alpine School District for their assistance and cooperation.
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