A Validity Study of an Implicit Phonological Awareness Paradigm The purpose of this investigation was to examine the validity of a nonsense-word-pairs paradigm as an implicit phonological awareness task. For this task one member of each nonsense-word-pair violated the rules of consonant combination in English (e.g., /∫kib/), and the other did not (e.g., /∫rib/). The subjects were required to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1997
A Validity Study of an Implicit Phonological Awareness Paradigm
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dee M. Lance
    University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Lori A. Swanson
    University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Harold A. Peterson
    University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dlance@cc1.uca.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Central Arkansas, Conway
    Currently affiliated with the University of Central Arkansas, Conway×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1997
A Validity Study of an Implicit Phonological Awareness Paradigm
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1002-1010. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1002
History: Received August 14, 1996 , Accepted February 26, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1997, Vol. 40, 1002-1010. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4005.1002
History: Received August 14, 1996; Accepted February 26, 1997

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the validity of a nonsense-word-pairs paradigm as an implicit phonological awareness task. For this task one member of each nonsense-word-pair violated the rules of consonant combination in English (e.g., /∫kib/), and the other did not (e.g., /∫rib/). The subjects were required to choose the member of the pair that contained permissible consonant sequence(s). Eighty-one normally developing first- and second-graders were given the implicit phonological awareness task, 3 explicit phonological awareness tasks, 2 reading tasks, and a multisyllabic word production task. There were significant correlations between the implicit phonological awareness task and all of the experimental tasks, with the exception of one. Additionally, the implicit phonological awareness task was sensitive to developmental differences between the first- and second-grade readers.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful to the students from the Knoxville, TN, area for their participation in this study. Additionally, we appreciate Pearl A. Gordon‖s and Mary Sue Younger‖s helpful suggestions during the preparation of the dissertation and the manuscript. We would also like to thank Laurence B. Leonard for his insightful comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript and also Richard G. Schwartz, Karen E. Pollock, and the two anonymous reviewers for their thoughtful comments on important aspects of the manuscript. This article is based on a doctoral dissertation completed at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
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