Scalp Potentials Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Tones in Dyslexia We recorded the far-field EEG potential evoked by amplitude modulation of acoustic stimuli (the amplitude modulation following response, AMFR) in adults with developmental dyslexia and in a matched control group of adults with no history of reading problems. The mean AMFR recorded from participants with dyslexia was significantly smaller than ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Scalp Potentials Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Tones in Dyslexia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ken I. McAnally
    University Laboratory of Physiology, Oxford, England
    Air Operations Division, Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 4331, Melbourne 3001, Australia
  • John F. Stein
    University Laboratory of Physiology, Oxford, England
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: ken.mcanally@dsto.defence.gov.au
  • Currently affiliated with the Air Operations Division, Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Australia.
    Currently affiliated with the Air Operations Division, Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Australia.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Scalp Potentials Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Tones in Dyslexia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 939-945. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.939
History: Received June 7, 1996 , Accepted February 25, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 939-945. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.939
History: Received June 7, 1996; Accepted February 25, 1997

We recorded the far-field EEG potential evoked by amplitude modulation of acoustic stimuli (the amplitude modulation following response, AMFR) in adults with developmental dyslexia and in a matched control group of adults with no history of reading problems. The mean AMFR recorded from participants with dyslexia was significantly smaller than that recorded from members of the control group. In contrast, the amplitude of the click-evoked auditory brainstem response ABR) was not significantly different between participant groups. Also, there was no difference between participant groups in the latency of the AMFR or ABR. The reduced AMFR in listeners with dyslexia may reflect impaired ability of the auditory system to follow rapid changes in stimulus energy, a cue believed to be important in the perception of speech.

Acknowledgments
We thank Piers Cornelissen for statistical advice, Alex Richardson for recruiting volunteers with dyslexia, and two anonymous reviewers for comments on the manuscript. This study was supported by Rodin Remediation.
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