Effect of Acoustic Cues on Labeling Fricatives and Affricates Previous studies have shown that manipulation of frication amplitude relative to vowel amplitude in the third formant frequency region affects labeling of place of articulation for the fricative contrast /s/- /∫/(Hedrick & Ohde, 1993; Stevens, 1985). The current study examined the influence of this relative amplitude manipulation in conjunction with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Effect of Acoustic Cues on Labeling Fricatives and Affricates
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Hedrick
    Boys Town National Research Hospital Omaha, NE
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, 457 South Stadium Hall, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0740
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Effect of Acoustic Cues on Labeling Fricatives and Affricates
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 925-938. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.925
History: Received May 29, 1996 , Accepted February 25, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 925-938. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.925
History: Received May 29, 1996; Accepted February 25, 1997

Previous studies have shown that manipulation of frication amplitude relative to vowel amplitude in the third formant frequency region affects labeling of place of articulation for the fricative contrast /s/- /∫/(Hedrick & Ohde, 1993; Stevens, 1985). The current study examined the influence of this relative amplitude manipulation in conjunction with presentation level, frication duration, and formant transition cues for labeling fricative place of articulation by listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss. Synthetic consonant-vowel (CV) stimuli were used in which the amplitude of the frication relative to vowel onset amplitude in the third formant frequency region was manipulated across a 20 dB range. The listeners with hearing loss appeared to have more difficulty using the formant transition component than the relative amplitude component for the labeling task than most listeners with normal hearing. A second experiment was performed with the same stimuli in which the listeners were given one additional labeling response alternative, the affricate /t∫/. Results from this experiment showed that listeners with normal hearing gave more /t∫/labels as relative amplitude and presentation level increased and frication duration decreased. There was a significant difference between the two groups in the number of affricate responses, as listeners with hearing loss gave fewer /t∫/labels.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grant #R01 DC00136 from the National Institutes of Health. I thank Dr. Ed Carney, Dr. Steve Neely, Robert Sullivan, and Brian Carlson for their computer software assistance, and Drs. Walt Jesteadt, Arlene Carney, Richard Fahey, and Renee Zakia for their help during the pilot stage of this project. In addition, I thank Dr. Michael Berbaum for his help on the statistical analyses and Drs. Sandra Gordon-Salant, Christopher Turner, Fan-Gang Zeng, and an anonymous reviewer for their contributions to the manuscript.
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