Effect of Time and Frequency Manipulation on Syllable Perception in Developmental Dyslexics Many people with developmental dyslexia have difficulty perceiving stop consonant contrasts as effectively as other people and it has been suggested that this may be due to perceptual limitations of a temporal nature. Accordingly, we predicted that perception of such stimuli by listeners with dyslexia might be improved by stretching ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Effect of Time and Frequency Manipulation on Syllable Perception in Developmental Dyslexics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ken I. McAnally
    University Laboratory of Physiology Oxford University, England
  • Peter C. Hansen
    University Laboratory of Physiology Oxford University, England
  • Piers L. Cornelissen
    University Laboratory of Physiology Oxford University, England
    Psychology Department, Ridley Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, U.K.
  • John F. Stein
    University Laboratory of Physiology Oxford University, England
  • Currently affiliated with the Air Operations Division, Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Australia.
    Currently affiliated with the Air Operations Division, Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory, Melbourne, Australia.×
  • Currently affiliated with the Psychology Department, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England.
    Currently affiliated with the Psychology Department, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Effect of Time and Frequency Manipulation on Syllable Perception in Developmental Dyslexics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 912-924. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.912
History: Received August 29, 1996 , Accepted February 17, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 912-924. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.912
History: Received August 29, 1996; Accepted February 17, 1997

Many people with developmental dyslexia have difficulty perceiving stop consonant contrasts as effectively as other people and it has been suggested that this may be due to perceptual limitations of a temporal nature. Accordingly, we predicted that perception of such stimuli by listeners with dyslexia might be improved by stretching them in time—equivalent to speaking slowly. Conversely, their perception of the same stimuli ought to be made even worse by compressing them in time—equivalent to speaking quickly. We tested 15 children with dyslexia on their ability to identify correctly consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) stimuli that had been stretched or compressed in the time domain. We also tested their perception of the same CVC stimuli after the formant transitions had been stretched or compressed in the frequency domain. Contrary to our predictions, we failed to find any systematic improvement in their performance with either manipulation. We conclude that simple manipulations in the time and frequency domains are unlikely to benefit the ability of people with dyslexia to discriminate between CVCs containing stop consonants.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank staff and students of Bloxham school for their participation and John Coleman of Oxford University Phonetics Department. This work was supported by the McDonnell-Pew Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience and the Rodin Remediation Academy.
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