Relationships Between Subjective Ratings and Objective Measures of Performance in Speechreading Sentences Ninety-six participants with normal hearing and 63 with severe-to-profound hearing impairment viewed 100 CID Sentences (Davis & Silverman, 1970) and 100 B-E Sentences (Bernstein & Eberhardt, 1986b). Objective measures included words correct, phonemes correct, and visual-phonetic distance between the stimulus and response. Subjective ratings were made on a 7-point confidence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Relationships Between Subjective Ratings and Objective Measures of Performance in Speechreading Sentences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    Demorest, Department of Psychology, UMBC, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250
  • Lynne E. Bernstein
    Center for Auditory and Speech Sciences Gallaudet University Washington, DC
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Demorest@umbc2.umbc.edu
  • Lynne E. Bernstein is currently affiliated with the House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, California.
    Lynne E. Bernstein is currently affiliated with the House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, California.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Relationships Between Subjective Ratings and Objective Measures of Performance in Speechreading Sentences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 900-911. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.900
History: Received September 11, 1996 , Accepted February 12, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 900-911. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.900
History: Received September 11, 1996; Accepted February 12, 1997

Ninety-six participants with normal hearing and 63 with severe-to-profound hearing impairment viewed 100 CID Sentences (Davis & Silverman, 1970) and 100 B-E Sentences (Bernstein & Eberhardt, 1986b). Objective measures included words correct, phonemes correct, and visual-phonetic distance between the stimulus and response. Subjective ratings were made on a 7-point confidence scale. Magnitude of validity coefficients ranged from .34 to .76 across materials, measures, and groups. Participants with hearing impairment had higher levels of objective performance, higher subjective ratings, and higher validity coefficients, although there were large individual differences. Regression analyses revealed that subjective ratings are predictable from stimulus length, response length, and objective performance. The ability of speechreaders to make valid performance evaluations was interpreted in terms of contemporary word recognition models.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this research were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Antonio, TX, November 1992, and at the Summer Institute of the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology, Salt Lake City, UT, June 1994. The research was supported by NIH grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, DC-00695 and DC-02107.
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