Miniature Head-Mounted Microphone for Voice Perturbation Analysis The miniature head-mounted microphone has become the microphone of choice in clinics, laboratories, and professional work settings where voice amplification or recording is needed and subject mobility is desirable. In this study, a miniature head-mounted condenser microphone was compared to a larger, professional grade stand-mounted condenser microphone for perturbation analysis. ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 1997
Miniature Head-Mounted Microphone for Voice Perturbation Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William S. Winholtz
    Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center The Denver Center for the Performing Arts Denver, CO
  • Ingo R. Titze, PhD
    Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center The Denver Center for the Performing Arts Denver, CO, and The National Center for Voice and Speech Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology The University of Iowa Iowa City
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Iowa, 330 WJSHC, Iowa City, IA 52242-1012
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: ingo-titze@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 1997
Miniature Head-Mounted Microphone for Voice Perturbation Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 894-899. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.894
History: Received November 12, 1996 , Accepted February 20, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 894-899. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.894
History: Received November 12, 1996; Accepted February 20, 1997

The miniature head-mounted microphone has become the microphone of choice in clinics, laboratories, and professional work settings where voice amplification or recording is needed and subject mobility is desirable. In this study, a miniature head-mounted condenser microphone was compared to a larger, professional grade stand-mounted condenser microphone for perturbation analysis. Amplitude and frequency perturbation measures of human phonation were made for comparison. The results indicate that only small differences exist between the two microphones. The only exception is when there is significant head movement, in which case the head-mounted microphone offers an advantage. Errors associated with variable source-to-microphone distance can therefore be reduced without losing baseline quality in transducing voice signals for analysis.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, grant No. R01 DC00387-04.
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