Adults Recovered From Stuttering Without Formal Treatment Perceptual Assessment of Speech Normalcy Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Adults Recovered From Stuttering Without Formal Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick Finn, PhD
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 901 Vassar NE, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: pfinn@unm.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Adults Recovered From Stuttering Without Formal Treatment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 821-831. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.821
History: Received September 4, 1996 , Accepted December 18, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 821-831. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.821
History: Received September 4, 1996; Accepted December 18, 1996

The purpose of this study was to determine if the speech of adults who self-judged that they were recovered from stuttering without the assistance of treatment is perceptually different from that of adults who never stuttered. Fifteen adult speakers verified as persons who had recovered from a valid stuttering problem without the assistance of treatment were compared with 15 adult speakers verified as persons with normally fluent speech. Judges viewed videotaped speech samples of all speakers and were instructed to decide whether a speaker used to stutter or never stuttered. A separate group of judges rated the same samples for speech naturalness. Various speech behavior measures were also obtained. Results revealed that the speech of speakers who used to stutter was perceptually different from that of speakers who never stuttered. This difference was correlated with unnatural sounding speech and a high frequency of part-word repetitions.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by a New Investigators Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation and a Research Allocations Grant from the University of New Mexico. Special thanks to Anne Cordes, PhD, for her helpful suggestions on an earlier version of this paper.
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