Auditory Processing in Individuals With Mild Aphasia A Study of Resource Allocation Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
Auditory Processing in Individuals With Mild Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura L. Murray, PhD
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences Indiana University Bloomington Bloomington, IN 47405
  • Audrey L. Holland
    Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
  • Pelagie M. Beeson
    Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona Tucson
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
Auditory Processing in Individuals With Mild Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 792-808. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.792
History: Received September 1, 1995 , Accepted January 28, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 792-808. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.792
History: Received September 1, 1995; Accepted January 28, 1997

This study examined the effects of lesion location (frontal vs. posterior) and nature of distraction (nonverbal vs. verbal secondary, competing task) on mildly aphasic individuals’ performances of listening tasks that required semantic judgments and lexical decisions under isolation, focused attention, and divided attention conditions. Despite comparable accuracy among all groups during isolation conditions, the aphasic groups responded less accurately and more slowly than the normal control group during focused and divided attention conditions. Generally, the two aphasic groups performed similarly, quantitatively and qualitatively. Demographic characteristics such as time post stroke did not correlate with performance decrements. Independent of group, all individuals showed greater disruption of auditory processing skills when the secondary task was verbal rather than nonverbal. Within a limited-capacity model of attention, the results suggest that aphasic individuals display impairments of attention and resource allocation and that these impairments negatively interact with their auditory processing abilities.

Acknowledgments
This study was performed as part of a dissertation by the first author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Arizona. We thank Scott Jackson and Debbie Johnson of St. Joseph’s Hospital, Janet Hawley of St. Mary’s Hospital, and Shannon Bryant of the University of Arizona for their help in recruiting subjects. We also wish to acknowledge Robert Brookshire, Malcolm McNeil, and Cynthia Thompson for their helpful comments on previous versions of this manuscript. This project was supported in part by the National Multipurpose Research and Training Grant DC01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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