The Extent to Which Psychometric Tests Differentiate Subgroups of Children With SLI This paper reports on the results of a large project involving 7-year-old children attending language units in England. A group of 242 children with specific language impairment (SLI) were assessed on a battery of psychometric tests. In addition, teacher interviews were carried out to ascertain teachers’ opinions of the children’s ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1997
The Extent to Which Psychometric Tests Differentiate Subgroups of Children With SLI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden
    Centre for Educational Needs School of Education University of Manchester England
    Centre for Educational Needs, Manchester University, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL
  • Alison Crutchley
    Centre for Educational Needs School of Education University of Manchester England
  • Nicola Botting
    Centre for Educational Needs School of Education University of Manchester England
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1997
The Extent to Which Psychometric Tests Differentiate Subgroups of Children With SLI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 765-777. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.765
History: Received January 30, 1996 , Accepted January 23, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1997, Vol. 40, 765-777. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4004.765
History: Received January 30, 1996; Accepted January 23, 1997

This paper reports on the results of a large project involving 7-year-old children attending language units in England. A group of 242 children with specific language impairment (SLI) were assessed on a battery of psychometric tests. In addition, teacher interviews were carried out to ascertain teachers’ opinions of the children’s difficulties. Cluster analysis revealed six robust subgroups of children with language difficulties. The findings are discussed in the context of other approaches to the classification of language impairment in children with special reference to the work of Rapin and Allen (1987).

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Nuffield Foundation for grant number AT251 [OD], Educational Transitions of Language-Impaired Children. We would also like to thank Dr. Brian Farragher for statistical advice, and the schools and language units who gave their time and facilities for our assessments.
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