Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Velopharyngeal Mechanism at Rest and During Speech in Chinese Adults and Children PurposeRecent applications of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique introduced accurate 3-dimensional measurements of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Further standardization of the data acquisition and analysis protocol was successfully applied to imaging adults at rest and during phonation. This study was designed to test and modify a noninvasive protocol for evaluating ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2010
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Velopharyngeal Mechanism at Rest and During Speech in Chinese Adults and Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wei Tian
    University of Maryland at College Park
  • Heng Yin
    Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China
  • Richard J. Redett
    Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, MD
  • Bing Shi
    Sichuan University
  • Jin Shi
    Sichuan University
  • Rui Zhang
    Sichuan University
  • Qian Zheng
    Sichuan University
  • Contact author: Wei Tian, University of Maryland at College Park, 0141D Lefrak Hall, College Park, MD 20742. E-mail: wtian@hesp.umd.edu.
Article Information
International & Global / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 01, 2010
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Velopharyngeal Mechanism at Rest and During Speech in Chinese Adults and Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2010, Vol. 53, 1595-1615. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0105)
History: Received May 28, 2009 , Revised November 23, 2009 , Accepted April 27, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2010, Vol. 53, 1595-1615. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0105)
History: Received May 28, 2009; Revised November 23, 2009; Accepted April 27, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

PurposeRecent applications of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique introduced accurate 3-dimensional measurements of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Further standardization of the data acquisition and analysis protocol was successfully applied to imaging adults at rest and during phonation. This study was designed to test and modify a noninvasive protocol for evaluating young children without using general anesthesia. In addition, the velopharyngeal structures and their maximal motion were compared between adults and children.

MethodMRI data were acquired in 12 young adults and 9 children at rest and during speech production. Multiple measurements were made on the velopharyngeal and craniofacial structures as well as on the levator veli palatini muscle.

ResultsMost of the ratio measurements of structural shape and maximal motion in the velopharyngeal and craniofacial regions were not significantly different between the adults and the children, despite the fact that the children had much smaller structures than the adults.

ConclusionThe proportion of the velopharyngeal mechanism remains stable in young children and adults so that the motions of the velum and pharyngeal walls are adequate to close the velopharyngeal port completely.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported, in part, by the General Research Board at the University of Maryland. We thank Phyllis Bonelli for her help in editing the first draft and the radiology technicians at the Kirby Research Center for assisting in the MRI scans. We also express our gratitude to all of the participants and their families.
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