Nebulized Isotonic Saline Versus Water Following a Laryngeal Desiccation Challenge in Classically Trained Sopranos PurposeTo examine the effects of nebulized isotonic saline (IS) versus sterile water (SW) on self-perceived phonatory effort (PPE) and phonation threshold pressure (PTP) following a surface laryngeal dehydration challenge in classically trained sopranos.MethodIn a double-blind, within-subject crossover design, 34 sopranos breathed dry air (relative humidity < 1%) transorally for 15 ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2010
Nebulized Isotonic Saline Versus Water Following a Laryngeal Desiccation Challenge in Classically Trained Sopranos
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristine Tanner
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Nelson Roy
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Ray M. Merrill
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Faye Muntz
    Voice Disorders Center, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Daniel R. Houtz
    Voice Disorders Center, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Cara Sauder
    University of New Mexico Hospitals, Albuquerque
  • Mark Elstad
    George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, and The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Julie Wright-Costa
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Contact author: Kristine Tanner, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Division of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112. E-mail: kristine.tanner@hsc.utah.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 01, 2010
Nebulized Isotonic Saline Versus Water Following a Laryngeal Desiccation Challenge in Classically Trained Sopranos
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2010, Vol. 53, 1555-1566. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0249)
History: Received November 17, 2009 , Revised February 8, 2010 , Accepted March 25, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2010, Vol. 53, 1555-1566. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0249)
History: Received November 17, 2009; Revised February 8, 2010; Accepted March 25, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeTo examine the effects of nebulized isotonic saline (IS) versus sterile water (SW) on self-perceived phonatory effort (PPE) and phonation threshold pressure (PTP) following a surface laryngeal dehydration challenge in classically trained sopranos.

MethodIn a double-blind, within-subject crossover design, 34 sopranos breathed dry air (relative humidity < 1%) transorally for 15 min and then nebulized 3 mL of IS or SW, or experienced a no-treatment control condition over 3 consecutive weeks. PPE and PTP were measured every 15 min from baseline through 2 hr postdesiccation.

ResultsPPE increased significantly following the laryngeal desiccation challenge in all 3 treatment conditions (p < .01). After nebulization, PPE returned to baseline for the IS condition only. For the SW and control conditions, PPE remained above baseline during the 2 hr after desiccation. No statistically significant changes in PTP following laryngeal desiccation were observed, although values for the IS condition remained below baseline for nearly 2 hr after nebulization. PPE and PTP were not significantly correlated.

ConclusionsFollowing a laryngeal surface dehydration challenge, classically trained sopranos reported increased vocal effort that persisted for at least 2 hr. Compared with SW, nebulized IS showed promise as an effective way to remediate the adverse, self-perceived effects of laryngeal desiccation.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by the Center for Interdisciplinary Arts and Technology Research Fellowship Program at The University of Utah. We thank the Division of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Utah, School of Medicine, for the use of the Steven D. Gray, M.D., Voice Research Memorial Lab. The grand piano used in this study was generously donated to the Voice Disorders Center at The University of Utah by Sharon Steele-McGee.
We thank Richard Lutz, John Moody, Rajiv Sharma, and Raghbir Makhar for their assistance during the preparation of the experimental protocol for this study. We also thank university students Jill Sharp, Michelle Monical, Ashley Chacon, and Leah Glasby for their assistance during data collection and analysis.
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