Identifying the Authoritative Judgments of Stuttering Comparisons of Self-Judgments and Observer Judgments Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1997
Identifying the Authoritative Judgments of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Anne K. Cordes
    The University of Georgia Athens
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1997
Identifying the Authoritative Judgments of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1997, Vol. 40, 581-594. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4003.581
History: Received June 17, 1996 , Accepted November 13, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1997, Vol. 40, 581-594. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4003.581
History: Received June 17, 1996; Accepted November 13, 1996

Reliable and accurate stuttering measurement depends on the existence of unambiguous descriptions or exemplars of stuttered and nonstuttered speech. The development of clinically meaningful and useful exemplars, in turn, requires determining whether persons who stutter judge the same speech to be stuttered that other observers judge to be stuttered. The purpose of these experiments, therefore, was to compare stuttering judgments from several sources: 15 adults who stutter, judging their own spontaneous speech; the same adults who stutter, judging each other's speech; and a panel of 10 authorities on stuttering research and treatment. Judgments were made under several conditions, including selfjudgments made while the speaker was talking and self- and other-judgments made from recordings in continuous and interval formats. Results showed substantial differences in stuttering judgments across speakers, judges, and judgment conditions, but across-task comparisons were complicated by low selfagreement for many judges. Some intervals were judged consistently by all judges to be Stuttered or Nonstuttered, across multiple conditions, but many other intervals were either not assigned replicable judgments or were consistently judged to be Nonstuttered by the speaker who had produced them but were not assigned consistent judgments by other judges. The implications of these findings for stuttering measurement are considered.

Acknowledgments
This paper was supported by Research Grant Number 5 R01 DC 00060-05 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. Preliminary data from some of the investigations described in this paper were included in presentations by the authors at the 1995 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Orlando, Florida. The authors express their sincerest appreciation to the subjects, researchers, and clinicians who participated in these studies. Special thanks to Richard Moglia and the late Peter Frank, who provided invaluable technical and statistical support for this and other studies conducted within this grant.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access