Determinants of Sentence Comprehension in Aphasic Patients in Sentence-Picture Matching Tasks The results of two studies of sentence comprehension in aphasic patients using sentence-picture matching tests are presented. In the first study, 52 aphasic patients were tested on 10 sentence types. Analysis of the number of correct responses per sentence type showed effects of syntactic complexity and number of propositions. Factor ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1997
Determinants of Sentence Comprehension in Aphasic Patients in Sentence-Picture Matching Tasks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Caplan
    Neuropsychology Laboratory Massachusetts General Hospital Boston
  • Gloria S. Waters
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders McGill University Montreal, Canada
  • Nancy Hildebrandt
    Neuropsychology Laboratory Massachusetts General Hospital Boston
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1997
Determinants of Sentence Comprehension in Aphasic Patients in Sentence-Picture Matching Tasks
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1997, Vol. 40, 542-555. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4003.542
History: Received September 18, 1995 , Accepted December 12, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1997, Vol. 40, 542-555. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4003.542
History: Received September 18, 1995; Accepted December 12, 1996

The results of two studies of sentence comprehension in aphasic patients using sentence-picture matching tests are presented. In the first study, 52 aphasic patients were tested on 10 sentence types. Analysis of the number of correct responses per sentence type showed effects of syntactic complexity and number of propositions. Factor analysis yielded first factors that accounted for two-thirds of the variance in performance to which all sentence types contributed. Clustering analysis yielded groups of patients whose performances progressively deteriorated and in which performance was more affected by sentence types that were harder for the group overall. These results were very similar to those previously obtained using an enactment task. In the second study, 17 aphasic patients were tested on the same 10 sentence types using both sentence-picture matching and enactment tasks. Correlational analyses showed that performance on the two tests was significantly correlated across both subjects and sentences. The results provide data relevant to the determinants of the complexity of a sentence in auditory comprehension.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Diseases (DC00942) to David Caplan and from the Medical Research Council of Canada (# MA8602) to Gloria Waters.
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