The Socioemotional Behaviors of Children With SLI Social Adaptation or Social Deviance? Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
The Socioemotional Behaviors of Children With SLI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Mabel L. Rice
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Contact author: Sean Redmond, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 390 South 1530 East, Room 1201, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252 Email: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Utah, Salt Lake City
    Currently affiliated with the University of Utah, Salt Lake City×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
The Socioemotional Behaviors of Children With SLI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 688-700. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.688
History: Received December 24, 1996 , Accepted December 4, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 688-700. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.688
History: Received December 24, 1996; Accepted December 4, 1997

Two models of the relationship between socioemotional behavior and verbal abilities are compared: Social Adaptation and Social Deviance. The socioemotional integrity of 17 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 20 unaffected children who were age-matched (AM) was examined using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Teacher's Report Form (TRF) at kindergarten and first grade. All CBCL and TRF syndrome scale means for both groups werewithin normal limits. Significant group x respondent interaction effects were observed; teachers, and not parents, rated the children with SLI as having more social and internalizing behavioral problems than their AM peers. Significant differences between groups were restricted to internalizing, social, and attention problems. Very little congruence or stability over time was observed in the clinical ratings. The outcomes support a Social Adaptation Model of socioemotional behavior and language impairment. Implications for the clinical management of children with SLI are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders awards R01 DC01803, awarded to Mabel L. Rice and Kenneth Wexler, and T32 DC00052-02, awarded to Sean M. Redmond.
We express special appreciation to Karla Haney and Shannon Wang for their assistance in data collection. Our special appreciation is expressed to the children, parents, and teachers who participated in this study and the following schools that supported this research. In Edgerton, KS: Edgerton Elementary; in Hutchinson, KS: Allen Elementary, Avenue A Elementary, Morgan Elementary School, Stafford Elementary, South Hutchinson Elementary, Union Valley Elementary; in Lawrence, KS: Centennial Elementary, Deerfield Elementary, Hillcrest Elementary, Hilltop Child Development Center, Kennedy Elementary, New York Elementary, Quail Run Elementary, St. John’s Elementary, Sunflower Elementary, Sunset Hills Elementary, Wakarusa Valley Elementary; in Lee’s Summit, MO: Meadow Lane Elementary; in Olathe, KS: Scarborough Elementary; in Ottawa, KS: Garfield Elementary, Hawthorne Elementary, Lincoln Elementary; in Overland Park, KS: Holy Trinity Elementary, Nativity Parish; in Wellsville, KS: Wellsville Elementary.
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