Acquisition of Linguistic and Cognitive Skills by Children With Cleft Palate This study compared the early cognitive and linguistic development of young children with cleft palate (N = 28) to that of noncleft children (N = 29). Measures included the Mental scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, the Minnesota Child Development Inventory, Mean Length of Utterance, and words acquired ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
Acquisition of Linguistic and Cognitive Skills by Children With Cleft Palate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia A. Broen
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Monica C. Devers
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Shirley S. Doyle
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Jo McCauley Prouty
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Karlind T. Moller
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Patricia A. Broen, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
    Contact author: Patricia A. Broen, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
Acquisition of Linguistic and Cognitive Skills by Children With Cleft Palate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 676-687. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.676
History: Received August 1, 1996 , Accepted October 30, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 676-687. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.676
History: Received August 1, 1996; Accepted October 30, 1997

This study compared the early cognitive and linguistic development of young children with cleft palate (N = 28) to that of noncleft children (N = 29). Measures included the Mental scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, the Minnesota Child Development Inventory, Mean Length of Utterance, and words acquired by 24 months. Children with cleft palate, although well within the normal range, performed significantly below the children in the control group on the Mental Scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, some subscales of the Minnesota Child Development Inventory, and words acquired by 24 months. Differences observed in the cognitive development of children with and without cleft palate were verbal as opposed to nonverbal (i.e., linguistic in nature) and were related to hearing status at 12 months and velopharyngeal adequacy.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH grant (NIDCD) R01-DC00533 and by grants to the Center for Research in Learning, Perception, and Cognition at the University of Minnesota (HD 07151; NSF/OBS-9001398). The authors wish to thank the numerous graduate students who worked so diligently to collect and analyze the data. Without them this study never would have been completed. We also thank the families who committed their time and energy to this project over almost 2 years.
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