Communicative Competence as Perceived by Adults With Severe Speech Impairments Associated With Cerebral Palsy The effects of aided message length (single-word vs. phrase-generated messages) and partner feedback (presence vs. absence of expanded message repetitions) on perceptions of the communicative competence of an adult augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system user were examined. Subjects consisted of 12 nonambulatory adults with severe speech impairments associated with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
Communicative Competence as Perceived by Adults With Severe Speech Impairments Associated With Cerebral Palsy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan L. Bedrosian
    Western Michigan University Kalamazoo
  • Linda A. Hoag
    Kansas State University Manhattan
  • Dallas Johnson
    Kansas State University Manhattan
  • Stephen N. Calculator
    University of New Hampshire Durham
  • Contact author: Jan Bedrosian, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008
    Contact author: Jan Bedrosian, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
Communicative Competence as Perceived by Adults With Severe Speech Impairments Associated With Cerebral Palsy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 667-675. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.667
History: Received March 7, 1997 , Accepted October 14, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 667-675. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.667
History: Received March 7, 1997; Accepted October 14, 1997

The effects of aided message length (single-word vs. phrase-generated messages) and partner feedback (presence vs. absence of expanded message repetitions) on perceptions of the communicative competence of an adult augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system user were examined. Subjects consisted of 12 nonambulatory adults with severe speech impairments associated with cerebral palsy. Four scripted videotaped conversational conditions involving the AAC system user and a typically speaking partner were employed to manipulate the two independent variables. A balanced incomplete block design was used. Following each viewing, subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess the communicative competence of the AAC system user. Results indicated that neither independent variable had an impact on the subjects' ratings of communicative competence. Findings are compared with those from an earlier investigation, and clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The first two authors wish to report their equal participation in this project. The authors express sincere appreciation to the adults who participated as subjects in this study. Their energy and enthusiasm, as well as their gratitude for the chance to participate in a study which sought their opinion, made this a valuable and unforgettable research experience for us. Appreciation is also extended to Barry Molineux for his consulting in the initial phase of this project.
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