The Acquisition of Arabic Consonants This normative study of the acquisition of consonants of Arabic as spoken in Jordan answered 4 questions: (1) What percentage of children at each of 9 age levels produced each consonant correctly? (2) What are the ages of customary production, mastery, and acquisition for each phoneme? (3) Does accuracy of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
The Acquisition of Arabic Consonants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mousa M. Amayreh
    University of Jordan Amman
  • Alice T. Dyson
    University of Florida Gainesville
  • Contact author: Alice T. Dyson, PhD, University of Florida, 335 Dauer Hall, P. O. Box 117420, Gainesville, FL 32611-7420. Email: adyson@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
The Acquisition of Arabic Consonants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 642-653. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.642
History: Received January 27, 1997 , Accepted October 6, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 642-653. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.642
History: Received January 27, 1997; Accepted October 6, 1997

This normative study of the acquisition of consonants of Arabic as spoken in Jordan answered 4 questions: (1) What percentage of children at each of 9 age levels produced each consonant correctly? (2) What are the ages of customary production, mastery, and acquisition for each phoneme? (3) Does accuracy of consonants within sound classes vary by position in the word? (4) What are the differences in ages of acquisition between Arabic and English? Samples were collected from 180 normally developing children between the ages of 2:0 and 6:4. The percentages of accuracy of both standard and acceptable consonants were plotted and showed clear developmental trends. Medial consonants were significantly more accurate than initial and final consonants. The ages of customary production, acquisition, and mastery of Arabic consonants were similar to those for English but with notable exceptions that have implications for description of phonological acquisition. Support for previously proposed universal sound acquisition sequences was found, but some language-specific effects were also seen.

Acknowledgments
This research is based on re-analysis of data collected for the first author’s doctoral dissertation conducted at the University of Florida under the direction of Alice Dyson. The work was supported in part by a grant made by the Government of Switzerland to the University of Jordan Center for Phonetics Research.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access