Concurrent and Predictive Validity of an Early Language Screening Program The efficacy of screening 2-year-old children for language delay using a parent-report questionnaire was investigated in three studies. The Language Development Survey (Rescorla, 1989) was mailed to 650 families at the time of their child's second birthday. Fifty-three percent of the surveys received by parents were completed and returned. Screening ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
Concurrent and Predictive Validity of an Early Language Screening Program
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Klee
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne England
  • David K. Carson
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • William J. Gavin
    State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Lisa Hall
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Amy Kent
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Shaily Reece
    University of Wyoming Laramie
  • Contact author: Thomas Klee, Department of Speech, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Queen Victoria Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, United Kingdom. Email: thomas.klee@newcastle.ac.uk
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
Concurrent and Predictive Validity of an Early Language Screening Program
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 627-641. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.627
History: Received April 10, 1997 , Accepted October 1, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 627-641. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.627
History: Received April 10, 1997; Accepted October 1, 1997

The efficacy of screening 2-year-old children for language delay using a parent-report questionnaire was investigated in three studies. The Language Development Survey (Rescorla, 1989) was mailed to 650 families at the time of their child's second birthday. Fifty-three percent of the surveys received by parents were completed and returned. Screening outcomes were then compared, in double-blind fashion, with the results of comprehensive clinical evaluations at ages 2 (N = 64) and 3 (N = 36). Parents' report of the size of their children's expressive vocabularies was highly correlated with clinical language measures at age 2. Children who screened positive performed significantly poorer than children who screened negative on standardized language tests and on measures taken from spontaneous conversation. The screening program demonstrated excellent sensitivity and specificity for identifying language delay at age 2 but somewhat lower levels for predicting developmental status one year later.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from the University of Wyoming Faculty Grant-in-Aid program to the first two authors. We gratefully acknowledge our colleagues at the University of Wyoming for their role in this project: E.J. McDonald, Phyllis Willer, and Jan Jelinek. We also thank our dedicated students for their help with data collection and analysis: Gail Muskina, Tracy Donaghy, Dorothy Philp, Leah Gearhardt, Michele Kirkbride, Celeste Gaskins, Janet Hinz, Maureen Cellmer, and Sarah Lee.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access