Socioeconomic Status and Gender Influences on Children's Dialectal Variations This investigation compares dialect use by African American children differing in socioeconomic status (SES) and gender. Subjects were 5- and 6-year-old boys (n = 30) and girls (n = 36), who were kindergartners attending schools in the Metropolitan Detroit area. Comparisons of the amount of dialect in the children's spontaneous ... Article/Report
Article/Report  |   June 1998
Socioeconomic Status and Gender Influences on Children's Dialectal Variations
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: julieaw@umich.edu
  • ©1998, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language
Article/Report   |   June 1998
Socioeconomic Status and Gender Influences on Children's Dialectal Variations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 618-626. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.618
History: Received December 10, 1996 , Accepted September 20, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 618-626. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.618
History: Received December 10, 1996; Accepted September 20, 1997

This investigation compares dialect use by African American children differing in socioeconomic status (SES) and gender. Subjects were 5- and 6-year-old boys (n = 30) and girls (n = 36), who were kindergartners attending schools in the Metropolitan Detroit area. Comparisons of the amount of dialect in the children's spontaneous discourse revealed systematic differences relative to SES and gender in the frequencies but not the forms of dialect in use. Children from lower-income homes, and boys, were more marked dialect users than their middle-class peers or girls. The sociolinguistic implications of the findings are discussed.

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