Selective Visual Masking in Speechreading Using digital video technology, selective aspects of a face can be masked by identifying the pixels that represent it and then, by adjusting the gray levels, effectively eliminate that facial aspect. In groups of young adults with normal vision and hearing, consonant-viseme recognition was measured for closed sets of vowel-consonant-vowel ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
Selective Visual Masking in Speechreading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill E. Preminger
    Department of Special Education and Individualized Services Kean University Union, NJ
  • Hwei-Bing Lin
    Center for Research in Speech and Hearing Sciences Graduate School City University of New York
  • Michel Payen
    Center for Research in Speech and Hearing Sciences Graduate School City University of New York
  • Harry Levitt
    Center for Research in Speech and Hearing Sciences Graduate School City University of New York
  • Contact Author: Jill Preminger, PhD, 6212 Innes Trace, Louisville, KY 40222. Email: jpreminger@mci2000.com
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
    Currently affiliated with the University of Louisville, Louisville, KY×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
Selective Visual Masking in Speechreading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 564-575. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.564
History: Received June 2, 1997 , Accepted February 5, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 564-575. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.564
History: Received June 2, 1997; Accepted February 5, 1998

Using digital video technology, selective aspects of a face can be masked by identifying the pixels that represent it and then, by adjusting the gray levels, effectively eliminate that facial aspect. In groups of young adults with normal vision and hearing, consonant-viseme recognition was measured for closed sets of vowel-consonant-vowel disyllables. In the first experiment viseme recognition was measured while the tongue and teeth were masked and while the entire mouth was masked. The results showed that masking of the tongue and teeth had little effect on viseme recognition, and when the entire mouth was masked, participants continued to identify consonant visemes with 70% or greater accuracy in the /a/ and // vowel contexts. In the second experiment, viseme recognition was measured when the upper part of the face and the mouth were masked and when the lower part of the face and the mouth were masked. The results showed that when the mouth and the upper part of the face were masked, performance was poor, but information was available to identify the consonantviseme /f/. When the mouth and the lower part of the face were masked, viseme recognition was quite poor, but information was available to discriminate the consonant-viseme /p/ from other consonant visemes.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5R01DC00507-6. The authors wish to thank Ken Grant, Charissa Lansing, Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, Donald Sims, and Quentin Summerfield for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access