Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures of Blood Flow Patterns in the Human Auditory Cortex in Response to Sound Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) holds exciting potential as a research and clinical tool for exploring the human auditory system. This noninvasive technique allows the measurement of discrete changes in cerebral cortical blood flow in response to sensory stimuli, allowing determination of precise neuroanatomical locations of the underlying brain parenchymal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures of Blood Flow Patterns in the Human Auditory Cortex in Response to Sound
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean C. Huckins
    MRI Research Laboratory Depts. of Radiology and Neurosurgery SUNY Health Science Center Syracuse, NY
  • Christopher W. Turner
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Karen A. Doherty
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Michael M. Fonte
    MRI Research Laboratory Dept. of Radiology SUNY Health Science Center Syracuse, NY
  • Nikolaus M. Szeverenyi
    MRI Research Laboratory Dept. of Radiology SUNY Health Science Center Syracuse, NY
  • Contact author: Sean C. Huckins, MRI Research Laboratory, 1109 Weiskotten Hall, SUNY Health Sciences Center, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210. Email: huckinss@vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Iowa, Iowa City
    Currently affiliated with the University of Iowa, Iowa City×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures of Blood Flow Patterns in the Human Auditory Cortex in Response to Sound
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 538-548. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.538
History: Received November 4, 1996 , Accepted January 12, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 538-548. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.538
History: Received November 4, 1996; Accepted January 12, 1997

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) holds exciting potential as a research and clinical tool for exploring the human auditory system. This noninvasive technique allows the measurement of discrete changes in cerebral cortical blood flow in response to sensory stimuli, allowing determination of precise neuroanatomical locations of the underlying brain parenchymal activity. Application of fMRI in auditory research, however, has been limited. One problem is that fMRI utilizing echo-planar imaging technology (EPI) generates intense noise that could potentially affect the results of auditory experiments. Also, issues relating to the reliability of fMRI for listeners with normal hearing need to be resolved before this technique can be used to study listeners with hearing loss. This preliminary study examines the feasibility of using fMRI in auditory research by performing a simple set of experiments to test the reliability of scanning parameters that use a high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio unlike that presently reported in the literature. We used consonant-vowel (CV) speech stimuli to investigate whether or not we could observe reproducible and consistent changes in cortical blood flow in listeners during a single scanning session, across more than one scanning session, and in more than one listener. In addition, we wanted to determine if there were differences between CV speech and nonspeech complex stimuli across listeners. Our study shows reproducibility within and across listeners for CV speech stimuli. Results were reproducible for CV speech stimuli within fMRI scanning sessions for 5 out of 9 listeners and were reproducible for 6 out of 8 listeners across fMRI scanning sessions. Results of nonspeech complex stimuli across listeners showed activity in 4 out of 9 individuals tested.

Acknowledgments
This project was funded by the Functional MRI Research Group, a consortium at the SUNY Health Science Center at Syracuse composed of University Hospital and the Departments of Neurosurgery, Radiology, and Neurology. This research was also supported by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC 00377-06A1), Syracuse University, and in part from NIH grant NS 35115-01, SUNY Health Science Center at Syracuse.
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