Altered Auditory Feedback Research Conditions and Situations of Everyday Life Comments on Ingham, Moglia, Frank, Costello Ingham, and Cordes (1997) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   June 01, 1998
Altered Auditory Feedback Research Conditions and Situations of Everyday Life
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Michael P. Rastatter
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Andrew Stuart
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders East Carolina University Greenville, NC
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   June 01, 1998
Altered Auditory Feedback Research Conditions and Situations of Everyday Life
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 511-513. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.511
History: Received August 6, 1997 , Accepted December 9, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 511-513. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.511
History: Received August 6, 1997; Accepted December 9, 1997
We have read with interest the time-series design study by Ingham, Moglia, Frank, Costello Ingham, and Cordes (1997) which examines the effects of frequency-altered feedback (FAF) on the speech of four adults who stutter. Although their interpretation of their data suggested that the effects of FAF were not consistent across each of their participants as a function of each experimental condition, they recognized that the response of one participant (E.O.) reflected positively on the possible effectiveness of FAF in the clinical environment. They concluded: “If the reductions observed in E.O.’s stuttering also occur during conversational speech, it is possible that FAF may be clinically effective in controlling stuttering for others who stutter” (p. 369). However, the authors further caution that “the extent to which E.O.’s response to FAF represents the clinical population of adults who stutter is unknown, so the clinical significance of this finding for other people who stutter is uncertain” (p. 370). It must be recognized, however, that although participant E.O. may not be representative of the stuttering population, the same notion must be held out for any of the other participants who, according to the Ingham et al. interpretation, did not respond in a positive manner to the experimental conditions.
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