The Effect of Lung Volume on Selected Phonatory and Articulatory Variables The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of manipulating lung volume (LV) on phonatory and articulatory kinematic behavior during sentence production in healthy adults. Five men and five women repeated the sentence "I sell a sapapple again" under five LV conditions. These included (1) speaking normally, (2) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
The Effect of Lung Volume on Selected Phonatory and Articulatory Variables
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher Dromey
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology The Toronto Hospital Toronto, Ontario Department of Speech-Language Pathology The University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario
  • Lorraine Olson Ramig
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center Denver Center for the Performing Arts
  • Contact author: Christopher Dromey, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, The Toronto Hospital, BC-3-603, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 2S8, Canada. Email: cdromey@playfair.utoronto.edu.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
The Effect of Lung Volume on Selected Phonatory and Articulatory Variables
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 491-502. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.491
History: Received April 11, 1997 , Accepted January 16, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 491-502. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.491
History: Received April 11, 1997; Accepted January 16, 1998

The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of manipulating lung volume (LV) on phonatory and articulatory kinematic behavior during sentence production in healthy adults. Five men and five women repeated the sentence "I sell a sapapple again" under five LV conditions. These included (1) speaking normally, (2) speaking after exhaling most of the air from the lungs, (3) speaking at end expiratory level (EEL), (4) speaking after a maximal inhalation, and (5) speaking after a maximal inhalation while attempting to maintain as normal a mode of speech as possible. From a multichannel recording, measures were made of LV, sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0) and semitone standard deviation (STSD), and upper and lower lip displacements and peak velocities. When compared with the reference condition, the sentence was spoken significantly more quickly at the lowest LV. SPL increased significantly for the high LV condition, as did the women's F0 and STSD. Upper lip displacements and peak velocities generally decreased for LVs other than the reference condition. Lower lip movements showed inconsistent changes as a function of LV. Adjustments to the LV for speech led to SPL and F0 changes consistent with a coordinated control of the respiratory system and the larynx. However, less consistent effects were observed in the articulatory kinematic measures, possibly because of a less direct biomechanical and neural control linkage between respiratory and articulatory structures.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a Small Grant Award from the Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Colorado and by NIH Grant R01-DCO1150. We are grateful for the suggestions offered by the associate editor, Dr. Robert Orlikoff, and three anonymous reviewers.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access