Effect of Extended Exposure to Frequency-Altered Feedback on Stuttering During Reading and Monologue An ABA time series design was used to examine the effect of extended, continuous exposure to frequency-altered auditory feedback (FAF) during an oral reading and monologue task on stuttering frequency and speech rate. Twelve adults who stutter participated. A statistically significant decrease in number of stuttering events, an increase in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1998
Effect of Extended Exposure to Frequency-Altered Feedback on Stuttering During Reading and Monologue
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joy Armson
    Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Contact author: Joy Armson, PhD, School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1R2. Email: jarmson@is.dal.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1998
Effect of Extended Exposure to Frequency-Altered Feedback on Stuttering During Reading and Monologue
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 479-490. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.479
History: Received February 10, 1997 , Accepted December 16, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1998, Vol. 41, 479-490. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4103.479
History: Received February 10, 1997; Accepted December 16, 1997

An ABA time series design was used to examine the effect of extended, continuous exposure to frequency-altered auditory feedback (FAF) during an oral reading and monologue task on stuttering frequency and speech rate. Twelve adults who stutter participated. A statistically significant decrease in number of stuttering events, an increase in number of syllables produced, and a decrease in percent stuttering was observed during the experimental segment relative to baseline segments for the oral reading task. In the monologue task, there were no statistically significant differences for the number of stuttering events, number of syllables produced, or percent stuttering between the experimental and baseline segments. Varying individual patterns of response to FAF were evident during the experimental segment of the reading task: a large consistent reduction in stuttering, an initial reduction followed by fluctuations in amount of stuttering, and essentially no change in stuttering frequency. Ten of 12 participants showed no reduction in stuttering frequency during the experimental segment of the monologue task. These findings have ramifications both for the clinical utilization of FAF and for theoretical explanations of fluency-enhancement.

Acknowledgments
We thank Kathryn Freeman and Patricia Dubourdieu for assistance with collecting and analyzing data and Wade Blanchard for statistical consultation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access