Performances of Young African American Children on Two Comprehension Tasks This investigation examines the performances of 63 urban 4-to 7-year-old African American children from middle-income homes on two tasks designed to assess the development of comprehension skills. Performances on a task designed to elicit responses to wh-questions, and another to distinctions between active and passive sentence constructions, revealed grade effects ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 1998
Performances of Young African American Children on Two Comprehension Tasks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly K. Craig
    University of Michigan Ann Arbor
  • Julie A. Washington
    University of Michigan Ann Arbor
  • Connie Thompson-Porter
    University of Michigan Ann Arbor
  • Contact author: Holly K. Craig, PhD, University of Michigan, 1111 E. Catherine Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2054. Email: hkc@umich.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 1998
Performances of Young African American Children on Two Comprehension Tasks
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 445-457. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.445
History: Received February 7, 1997 , Accepted August 28, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 445-457. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.445
History: Received February 7, 1997; Accepted August 28, 1997

This investigation examines the performances of 63 urban 4-to 7-year-old African American children from middle-income homes on two tasks designed to assess the development of comprehension skills. Performances on a task designed to elicit responses to wh-questions, and another to distinctions between active and passive sentence constructions, revealed grade effects and a positive relationship to age. The findings are discussed in terms of the appropriateness of using tasks of these types with young African American boys and girls who are dialect users.

Acknowledgments
This investigation was supported by research grant number 1 RO1 DC 02313–01A1 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. Special thanks to the principals, teachers, parents, and students of the Oak Park, MI public school system for supporting this project.
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