The Development of Grammatical Case Distinctions in the Use of Personal Pronouns by Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers Data on personal pronoun development in Spanish-speaking children was obtained in this study. Forty monolingual Puerto Rican Spanish-speaking children between the ages of 2;0 and 3;11 participated in the investigation. Two tasks were designed to obligate production of nominative and object pronouns in both reflexive and non-reflexive forms. Productive use ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1998
The Development of Grammatical Case Distinctions in the Use of Personal Pronouns by Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Raquel T. Anderson
    Indiana University Bloomington
  • Contact author: Raquel T. Anderson, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47401. Email: raanders@indiana.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1998
The Development of Grammatical Case Distinctions in the Use of Personal Pronouns by Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 394-406. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.394
History: Received July 29, 1996 , Accepted August 4, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 394-406. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.394
History: Received July 29, 1996; Accepted August 4, 1997

Data on personal pronoun development in Spanish-speaking children was obtained in this study. Forty monolingual Puerto Rican Spanish-speaking children between the ages of 2;0 and 3;11 participated in the investigation. Two tasks were designed to obligate production of nominative and object pronouns in both reflexive and non-reflexive forms. Productive use and error analysis data were obtained and compared to previous data on pronoun development in English. By contrast with the order of productive use of grammatical case distinctions reported in the literature for English-speaking children, the children in the present study demonstrated a pattern in which nominative pronoun use preceded object case use. Implications of these findings for developmental theories that have been presented to explain pronoun development are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This investigation was supported by a dissertation year grant provided by Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. I would like to thank Christine Dollaghan, Matthew Rispoli, and two anonymous reviewers for their suggestions for improving this manuscript.
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