Me or My Two Different Patterns of Pronoun Case Errors Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1998
Me or My
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Matthew Rispoli
    Arizona State University Tempe
  • Contact author: Matthew Rispoli, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Box 870102, Tempe, AZ 85287-0102. E-mail: rispoli@asu.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1998
Me or My
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 385-393. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.385
History: Received January 7, 1997 , Accepted July 14, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 385-393. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.385
History: Received January 7, 1997; Accepted July 14, 1997

This paper investigates why some young children prefer to replace I with me (me-children), whereas others prefer to replace I with my (my-children). The data come from 12 children, observed monthly, from 1;0 to 3;0. It was found that the percentage of errors in which me replaced I (the me-error rate) was positively correlated with the correct production of me as an objective pronoun (the me-total). The me for I and my for I errors were antagonistic, with one of the patterns almost always dominating over the other, resulting in a clear individual difference between me-children and my-children. It was also found that the me-total during the period in which my for I replacements first emerged prefigured whether a child would become a me-child or a my-child.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to acknowledge the contribution of Betty Hart who collected the data used in this paper as part of the Juniper Gardens Language Project Database. Tessa Fouquet and Jennifer Lane helped in the analysis of the data. The author would also like to acknowledge the following colleagues for their advice and criticism: Pamela Hadley, David Ingram, Mary Evelyn Moore, Christine Dollaghan, and two anonymous reviewers.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access