Age and Volume Effects on Liquid Swallowing Function in Normal Women Understanding the nature of swallowing in persons without swallowing problems is a prerequisite to evaluating the nature and extent of dysphagia in persons with compromised swallowing. In order to determine how swallowing varies with age and with liquid bolus volume in women, we assessed 167 normal female swallowers videofluoroscopically and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1998
Age and Volume Effects on Liquid Swallowing Function in Normal Women
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alfred W. Rademaker
    Northwestern University Chicago, IL
  • Barbara Roa Pauloski
    Northwestern University Chicago, IL
  • Laura A. Colangelo
    Northwestern University Chicago, IL
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Alfred W. Rademaker, PhD, 680 North Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1104, Chicago, IL 60611.
    Contact author: Alfred W. Rademaker, PhD, 680 North Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1104, Chicago, IL 60611.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1998
Age and Volume Effects on Liquid Swallowing Function in Normal Women
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 275-284. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.275
History: Received February 25, 1997 , Accepted November 5, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1998, Vol. 41, 275-284. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4102.275
History: Received February 25, 1997; Accepted November 5, 1997

Understanding the nature of swallowing in persons without swallowing problems is a prerequisite to evaluating the nature and extent of dysphagia in persons with compromised swallowing. In order to determine how swallowing varies with age and with liquid bolus volume in women, we assessed 167 normal female swallowers videofluoroscopically and obtained multiple measures of swallowing function. The women in this study demonstrated a change in swallowing function with age, due primarily to an increase in pharyngeal transit and total duration of the motor response. The duration of closure and opening of valves in the upper aerodigestive tract also increased with age, and the duration of laryngeal elevation and hyoid movement peaked in the 60–79-year-old age groups. Bolus volume effects were quite consistent across most measures. As the bolus volume increased from 1 ml to 10 ml, transit times decreased and durations of valve closure and opening increased. The results of this study may be used to specify the relationship of swallowing function to age and liquid bolus volume in women, relationships that heretofore have been observed only in part and in smaller and more heterogeneous populations.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by NIH/NCI P01 CA40007.
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