The Role of Fundamental Frequency and Duration in the Perception of Linguistic Stress by Individuals With Brain Damage Two tests of the ability of individuals with left-hemisphere damage (LHD) and right-hemisphere damage (RHD) and non-brain-damaged participants to identify phonemic and emphatic stress contrasts were undertaken. From a set of naturallyproduced base stimuli, two additional stimulus sets were derived. In one, fundamental frequency (F0) cues to stress were neutralized, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1998
The Role of Fundamental Frequency and Duration in the Perception of Linguistic Stress by Individuals With Brain Damage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shari R. Baum
    McGill University Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Contact author: Shari R. Baum, PhD, School of Communication Sciences & Disorders, McGill University, 1266 Pine Avenue, W., Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A8 Canada.
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1998
The Role of Fundamental Frequency and Duration in the Perception of Linguistic Stress by Individuals With Brain Damage
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 31-40. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.31
History: Received November 20, 1996 , Accepted August 19, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 31-40. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.31
History: Received November 20, 1996; Accepted August 19, 1997

Two tests of the ability of individuals with left-hemisphere damage (LHD) and right-hemisphere damage (RHD) and non-brain-damaged participants to identify phonemic and emphatic stress contrasts were undertaken. From a set of naturallyproduced base stimuli, two additional stimulus sets were derived. In one, fundamental frequency (F0) cues to stress were neutralized, whereas in the other duration cues were effectively neutralized. Results demonstrated that individuals with LHD were unable to identify phonemic stress contrasts with better-thanchance accuracy; individuals with RHD performed worse than normal participants but significantly better than the patients with LHD—particularly with the original full-cue stimuli. All groups performed better on the emphatic stress subtest, with the scores of only the patients with LHD at chance level for the F0-neutralized stimuli. The findings are considered in relation to hypotheses concerning the hemispheric lateralization of prosodic processing, particularly with respect to a hypothesis that posits differential lateralization for specific acoustic parameters.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Medical Research Council of Canada. The assistance of Anita Shuper in data gathering is most appreciated. I am also grateful to Marc Pell, Associate Editor Michael Cannito, and three anonymous reviewers for helpful comments.
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