Modality Interactions of Speech and Signing in Simultaneous Communication This study addresses speech and signing interaction during simultaneous communication (SC). Productions of sentence stimuli by ASL-English bilinguals (CODAs) and signed English (SE) users who know no ASL (SIMCOMs) were compared in two conditions (speech-alone or signing-alone, speech and signing combined). Speech took longer combined than alone, whereas SE took ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1998
Modality Interactions of Speech and Signing in Simultaneous Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronnie B. Wilbur
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Lesa Petersen
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Ronnie B. Wilbur, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, 1353 Heavilon Hall, B-13, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1998
Modality Interactions of Speech and Signing in Simultaneous Communication
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 200-212. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.200
History: Received March 21, 1997 , Accepted June 16, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 200-212. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.200
History: Received March 21, 1997; Accepted June 16, 1997

This study addresses speech and signing interaction during simultaneous communication (SC). Productions of sentence stimuli by ASL-English bilinguals (CODAs) and signed English (SE) users who know no ASL (SIMCOMs) were compared in two conditions (speech-alone or signing-alone, speech and signing combined). Speech took longer combined than alone, whereas SE took longer alone than combined. The increased duration of speech-combined resulted from increased syllable duration, number of gaps, and gap duration. Rate of signing had a significant effect on speech duration. The decreased duration of signed sentences combined resulted from decreased sign duration, decreased gap duration, and increased sign omissions. Knowledge of ASL was reflected in qualitative differences between the two groups. Sign omissions were analyzed by grammatical category; these are discussed in terms of context-supported permissible deletions and the compensatory use of ASL nonmanual marking devices.

Acknowledgments
R. Wilbur and K. Dykstra presented a preliminary report of the speech results reported here at the 1992 ASHA Convention. This research was funded by NIH grant R01-DC00935 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Thanks to Jack Gandour for access to the Phonetics Laboratory speech analysis equipment; to Glenis Long for access to the anechoic chamber; and to Lisa Goffman, Michael Lynch, and David Ertmer for their useful feedback on drafts of the manuscript. Kelly Dykstra, Wynne Janis, Maggie Rolfe, Angie Ekola, and Elke Hilf contributed invaluable assistance in data collection, transcription, and measurement. Amy Westbury conducted the preliminary analysis of nonmanuals used during the production of speech, SE, and SC. A special thanks to Kim Bjarkman for assistance in data analysis, technical editing, and production of the manuscript. We thank the Indianapolis Deaf community for their expertise, moral support, and willingness to assist with our research.
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