Stability and Patterning of Speech Movement Sequences in Children and Adults Children (aged 4 and 7 years) and young adults produced a six-syllable utterance 15 times. The displacement of the lower lip was recorded with an Optotrak system and analyzed in a number of ways. First, using a procedure recently developed in our laboratory, displacement records from the 15 repetitions were ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   February 01, 1998
Stability and Patterning of Speech Movement Sequences in Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne Smith
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Lisa Goffman
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Anne Smith, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: asmith@purdue.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1998
Stability and Patterning of Speech Movement Sequences in Children and Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 18-30. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.18
History: Received September 17, 1996 , Accepted July 23, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 18-30. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.18
History: Received September 17, 1996; Accepted July 23, 1997

Children (aged 4 and 7 years) and young adults produced a six-syllable utterance 15 times. The displacement of the lower lip was recorded with an Optotrak system and analyzed in a number of ways. First, using a procedure recently developed in our laboratory, displacement records from the 15 repetitions were amplitude- and time-normalized, and the spatiotemporal index (the STI) was computed. The STI reflects the degree to which repeated performance of a task produces movement trajectories that converge on a single pattern. Children produced less stable movement trajectories, as reflected in higher values on the STI. In a second analysis, standard measurements of amplitude and peak velocity were made for two opening and two closing lip movements. These measures suggested that, relative to the size of their oral structures, children have large movement ranges in speech. Also, children tend to move with a lower peak velocity. This large-amplitude, low-velocity movement style may reflect different underlying control processes. Finally, another analysis focused on open-close movement sequences associated with two words of the utterance. A patternrecognition algorithm applied to the normalized waveforms from the open-close sequences revealed that children and adults produced equally distinctive movement trajectories for the two syllables. Taken together, these preliminary results suggest that nonlinear and nonuniform changes occur in components of the speech motor system during development.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIH grants DC00559 and DC02527. Our thanks to Howard Zelaznik for his help in all phases of this experiment.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access